Old World Sparrows (1)

House Sparrow Passer domesticusElegant yet dumpy, conspicuous yet dull, sophisticated yet streetwise, widespread yet local, sparrows are blessed with all these properties. Since some sparrow species have been associated with human habitation, naming them has been an old habit. Thus, for instance, in the fourth century BC Aristotle mentions ‘sparrows’ (no distinction is made to any of the three Greek species, or even to Rock Sparrow Petronia petronia or White-winged Snowfinch Montifringilla nivalis) in Natural History, in J.A. Smith and W.D. Ross (eds.), The Works of Aristotle, iv: Historia animalium, trans. D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1910), 613a29–34, 613b1.

Passer was first mentioned by Mathurin Jacques Brisson in an identification ‘Table Méthodique des oiseaux divisés en ordres’ in his Ornithologie (Paris: Bauche, 1760), i. 36, a full description was published in a later volume, Ornithologie (Paris: Bauche, 1760), iii. 71–72, although here the genus is presented as a group called Passerinum (= sparrow-like, from Latin -inus = adjectival suffix: pertaining to), whereas the subsequent species accounts are all Passer.

The International Ornithological Congress World Bird List lists 28 Passer species and 48 subspecies. A bibliography and translation of their names follows here.

  • Saxaul SparrowPasser ammodendri = Saxaul Sparrow – most likely for Haloxylan ammodendron Black Saxaul and not for the genus Ammodendron Sand Acacia, still from Greek άμμος, ammos = sand, and Greek δένδρον, dendron = tree – discovered by Russian naturalist Nikolai Severtzov, collected by Charles Dode, who presented specimen at the 16 May 1871 meeting of the Zoological Society of London, published in Proceedings of the Scientific Meetings of the Zoological Society of London, 1871/31, 480–481 (indexed as ‘Exhibition of, and remarks upon, animals from the Amoor and Turkestan’), and described by English ornithologist John Gould in Birds of Asia (London: Gould, 1872) v. pl. 15, pt 24, as Turkestan Sparrow;
    • P. a. ammodendri – the nominate form;
    • P. a. nigricans = Dusky Sparrow – from Latin niger = black, and Latin -ans = adjectival suffix, hence nigricans = blackish, swarthy – described by Armenian ornithologist Leo S. Stepanyan in ‘The geographical variability of the Saxaul Sparrow (Passer ammodendri Gould)’, Archives of the Zoological Museum of Moscow State University, 8 (1961), 220;
    • P. a. stoliczkae = Stoliczka’s Sparrow – for Moravian palaeontologist Ferdinand Stoliczka, who collected the type specimen, and Latin -e = adjectival suffix – described by British ornithologist Allan Octavian Hume as part of ‘Novelties’, Stray Feathers, 2/6 (1874), 516–518, as Passer Stoliczkæ;
  • House SparrowPasser domesticus = House Sparrow – from Latin domus = house, and Latin -ticus = adjectival suffix, enlargement of -cus = characteristic of – described by Carl Linnaeus (as Caroli Linnæi) in Systema naturæ (10th edn., Holmiæ: Laurentii Salvii, 1758), i. 183, as Fringilla domestica with Passer domesticus in the list of synonyms;
    • P. d. domesticus – the nominate form;
    • P. d. balearoibericus = Hispanic Sparrow – for Balearic Islands, from Latin Baleares = Balearic Islands, and Latin -o = suffix, here interfix, and for Iberian Peninsula, from Latin Hiberia = Iberia, and Latin -cus = adjectival suffix (characteristic of) – described by German ornithologist Adolf von Jordans in ‘Neue Vogelrassen von den Balearen’, Falco, 19/Sonderheft (1923), 4;
    • P. d. biblicus = Biblical Sparrow – from Latin biblia = Bible, and Latin -cus = adjectival suffix (pertaining to) – the type specimen, a male collected on 2 April 1897 near Sueme in Palestine, was acquired by German natural history dealer Wilhelm Schlüter and described by Ernst Hartert in Die Vögel der paläarktischen Fauna (Berlin: Friedländer, 1904) i. Heft 2, 149, as Passer domestica biblicus;
    • P. d. hyrcanus = Hyrcanian Sparrow – for Hyrcania, from Latin Hyrcania, and Latin -us = masculine adjectival suffix – described by Ukranian zoologist Nikolai Zarudny and A.E. Kudashev in Наша охота, 20 (1916), 38;
    • P. d. persicus = Iranian Sparrow – for Iran, from Latin Persia = Iran, and Latin -cus = adjectival suffix (characteristic of) – described by Ukranian zoologist Nikolai Zarudny and A.E. Kudashev in Наша охота, 20 (1916), 37;
    • P. d. indicus = Indian Sparrow – for India, from Latin India, and Latin -cus = adjectival suffix (characteristic of) – described by Scottish naturalist William Jardine and English ornithologist Prideaux John Selby in Illustrations of Ornithology (Edinburgh: Lizars, 1831) iii. pl. 118, p. 29;
    • P. d. bactrianus = Bactrian Sparrow – for Bactria, from Latin Bactria (or Bactriana), and Latin -us = masculine adjectival suffix – described by Ukranian zoologist Nikolai Zarudny and A.E. Kudashev in Наша охота, 20 (1916), 37;
    • P. d. parkini = Parkin’s Sparrow – for British naturalist Thomas Parkin, and Latin -i = masculine adjectival suffix – at the 250th meeting of the British Ornithologists’ Club on 13 October 1920, English ornithologist Claude B. Tivehurst presented the species on behalf of English ornithologist Hugh Whistler, who had collected and described the type specimen at Srinagar, Kashmir, published in Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 41/253 (1920), 13–14;
    • P. d. hufufae = Hofuf Sparrow – for Al-Hofuf (or Hufuf), and Latin -ae = adjectival suffix – presented to the 286th meeting of the British Ornithologists’ Club on 8 October 1924, the type specimen was collected by Percy Cox and English ornithologist Robert Ernest Cheesman in Al-Hofuf, described by English ornithologist Claude B. Tivehurst and Cheesman in Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 45/290 (1924), 19–20;
    • P. d. tingitanus = Tangier Sparrow – for Tangier, from Latin Tingis = Tangier (probably through the Roman Tingitana, and Latin -us = adjectival suffix – described by French naturalist Victor Loche in Histoire naturelle des oiseaux (Paris: Arthus Bertrand, 1867) i. 132;
    • P. d. niloticus = Nile Sparrow – for Nile, from Latin Niloticus, translated from Greek Νειλωτιχοζ = of the Nile – presented to the 152nd meeting of the British Ornithologists’ Club on 16 June 1909, collected by English ornithologists Michael John Nicoll and John James Lewis Bonhote in Faiyum, description published in Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 23/153 (1909), 101–102;
    • P. d. rufidorsalis = Rufous-backed Sparrow – from Latin rufus = rufous, and Latin dorsum = back, and Latin -alis = relational adjectival suffix – described briefly by German ornithologist Christian Ludwig Brehm in ‘Verzeigniss der europäischen Vögel nach den Species und Subspecies’, Naumannia, 5 (1855), 277;

    HBW distinguishes two groups: a domesticus group (House Sparrow), which includes P. d. domesticus, P. d. balearoibericus, P. d. tingitanus, P. d. niloticus, P. d. biblicus, P. d. persicus; and an indicus group (Indian Sparrow), which includes P. d. hyrcanus, P. d. indicus, P. d. rufidorsalis, P. d. hufufae, P. d. bactrianus, P. d. parkini;

  • Italian SparrowPasser italiae = Italian Sparrow – for Italy, from Latin Italia = Italy, and Latin -e = adjectival suffix – described by French ornithologist Louis Jean Pierre Vieillot in Nouveau dictionnaire d’histoire naturelle (new edn., Paris: Deterville, 1817), xii. 199–200;
  • Spanish SparrowPasser hispaniolensis = Iberian Sparrow – for Hispania, from Latin Hispania = Iberian Peninsula, and Latin -ensis = geographical adjectival suffix – described by Coenraad Jacob Temminck in Manuel d’ornithologie (2nd edn., Paris: Cousin, 1820), i. 353–354, as Gros-bec espanol Fringilla hispaniolensis, where gros-bec = hawfinch in the Manuel, and Latin fringilla = finch;
  • Sind SparrowPasser pyrrhonotus = Fiery backed Sparrow – from Greek πυρος, puros = fire, and Greek νωτον, nōton = back – collected by British explorer Alexander Burnes at Buhawalpur (as Burawalpore) in ‘Seinde’ (Sindh?), described by English zoologist Edward Blyth in ‘Synopsis of Indian Fringillidæ’, Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 13/156 (1845), 946;
  • Somali SparrowPasser castanopterus = Chestnut-winged Sparrow – from Greek καστανον, kastanon = chestnut, and Greek -πτερος, -pteros = -winged – described by English zoologist Edward Blyth in ‘Report of a zoological collection from the Somali country’, Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 24/4 (1855), 302;
    • P. c. castanopterus = the nominate form;
    • P. c. fulgens = Shining Sparrow – from Latin fulgere = to shine, and Latin -ens = adjectival suffix – the type specimen was part of the collection at the United States National Museum, collected by American ornithologist Edgar Alexander Mearns in Indunumara Mountains, Kenya on 15 July 1912, described by American ornithologist Herbert Friedmann in ‘The geographic forms of the Somali Sparrow, Passer castanopterus Blyth’, Occasional Papers of the Boston Society of Natural History, 5 (1931), 428;
  • Russet SparrowPasser cinnamomeus = Cinnamon-coloured Sparrow – from Latin cinnamomum = cinnamon, and Latin -eus = attributive adjectival suffix – presented by English ornithologist John Gould at the 8 December 1935 meeting of the Zoological Society of London, description published in Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, pt 3 1835/36 (1836), 184 (indexed as ‘Characters of several new species of incessorial birds, including a new genus (Stenorhynchus)’), as Pyrgita cinnamomea;

    Recent name change of Passer rutilans to Passer cinnamomeus after research by Czech ornithologist Jiří Mlíkovský showed that cinnamomeus (Gould) was published nearly nine months before rutilans (Temminck), in ‘Correct name for the Asian Russet Sparrow’, Chinese Birds, 2/2 (2011), 109–110;

  • Plain-backed SparrowPasser flaveolus = Yellowish Sparrow – from Latin flavus = golden, yellow, and Latin -olus diminutive suffix – ‘procured’ by Arthur Purves Phayre in Arakan (present-day Rakhine State), Myanmar, described by English zoologist Edward Blyth in ‘Synopsis of Indian Fringillidæ’, Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 13/156 (1845), 946–947;
  • Dead Sea SparrowPasser moabiticus = Moab Sparrow – from Latin moabites = people from Moab, and Latin -icus = adjectival suffix (pertaining to) – exhibited at the Scientific Meeting of the Zoological Society of London, 26 April 1864, by Philip Sclater, collected in Palestine by English ornithologist Henry Baker Tristram, who described the species in Proceedings of the Scientific Meetings of the Zoological Society of London, 1864/11 (1864), 169–170 (indexed as H.B. Tristram, ‘Descriptions of new birds from Palestine’);
  • Iago SparrowPasser iagoensis = Santiago Sparrow – for Santiago, Cape Verde, and Latin -ensis = geographical adjectival suffix – the type specimen was collected by English naturalist Charles Darwin at Santiago (as St. Iago) and exhibited at the 25 July 1837 meeting of the Zoological Society of London by English ornithologist John Gould, who described the species in Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, pt 5 1837/55 (1838), 77–78, as Pyrgita Iagoensis – HBW lists this species as Cape Verde Sparrow;
  • Great SparrowPasser motitensis = Motito Sparrow – for Motito, near Old Lakatoo, South Africa, and Latin -ensis = geographical adjectival suffix – described by Scottish zoologist Andrew Smith in Report of the Expedition for Exploring Central Africa, from the Cape of Good Hope (Cape Town: Government Gazette Office, 1836), 50 (app. 1), as Pyrgita Motitentis;
    • P. m. benguellensis = Benguela Sparrow – for Benguela (former spelling Benguella), and Latin -ensis = geographical adjectival suffix – described by British ornithologist Hubert Lynes in ‘On the birds of North and Central Darfur: taxo‐nomic appendix – Part III–X’, Ibis, 68/2 (1926), 380;
    • P. m. motitensis – the nominate form;
    • P. m. subsolanus = Eastern Sparrow – from Latin subsolanus = eastern, from Latin sub = beneath, and Latin sol, solis = sun – type specimen collected in Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) on 14 April 1951, placed in the collection of the National Museum of Southern Rhodesia, where it was discovered by Swedish zoologist Gustaf Rudebeck in 1956, but not named, described by Scottish ornithologist Phillip Clancey in Durban Museum Novitates, 7/5 (1964), 138–139;
  • Socotra Sparrow Passer insularisSocotra SparrowPasser insularis = Island Sparrow – from Latin insula = island, and Latin -is = adjectival suffix – collected by Scottish botanist Isaac Bayley Balfour in Socotra in February–March 1880, described by English zoologist Philip Sclater and German ornithologist Gustav Hartlaub in ‘On the birds collected in Socotra by Prof. I.B. Balfour’, Proceedings of the Scientific Meetings of the Zoological Society of London, 1881/11, 169–170, paper read to the meeting of the Zoological Society of London on 18 January 1881;
  • Abd al-Kuri SparrowPasser hemileucus = Half-white Sparrow – from Greek prefix ἡμι-, hēmi- = half, and Greek λευκος, leukos = white – collected by Scottish ornithologists William Robert Ogilvie-Grant and Henry Ogg Forbes on Abd al Kuri, December 1898/February 1899, during an expedition to Socotra, described in ‘The expedition to Sokotra: I. Descriptions of the new species of birds’, Bulletin of the Liverpool Museums, 2/1 (1899), 3 – split from Passer insularis after 2008 recommendation;
  • Kenya SparrowPasser rufocinctus = Rufous-banded Sparrow – from Latin rufus = rufous, and Latin cinctus = banded – discovered by German explorer Gustav Fischer near Lake Naivasha, presented by Fischer and German ornithologist Anton Reichenow at the 3 December 1883 meeting of the Allgemeinen deutschen Ornithologischen Gesellschaft zu Berlin, description published in ‘Neue Vogelarten aus dem Massailand (Inneres Ostafrika)’, Journal für Ornithologie, 32/165 (1884), 55;
  • Shelley’s SparrowPasser shelleyi = Shelley’s Sparrow – for English ornithologist George Ernest Shelley, and Latin -i = adjectival suffix – collected by Frederick John Jackson, described by English ornithologist Richard Bowdler Sharpe in ‘On the birds collected by Mr. F.J. Jackson, F.Z.S., during his recent expedition to Uganda through the territory of the Imperial British East-African Company: Part I’, Ibis, 6th ser. 3/10 (1891), 256 – split from Passer rufocinctus after 2004 recommendation – HBW lists this species as White Nile Sparrow;
  • Kordofan SparrowPasser cordofanicus = Kordofan Sparrow – for Kordofan, Sudan, and Latin -icus = adjectival suffix (pertaining to) – mentioned by German ornithologist Theodor von Heuglin in Nachträge und Berichtigungen zur Ornithologie Nordost-Afrika’s, appendix to Ornithologie Nordost-Afrika’s (Cassel: Fischer, 1871), ii. app. 141 – split from Passer rufocinctus after 2004 recommendation;
  • Cape SparrowPasser melanurus = Black-tailed Sparrow – from Greek μελανος, melanos = black, and Greek -ουρος, -ouros = -tailed – described by German zoologist Philipp Ludwig Statius Müller in Des Ritters Carl von Linné vollständigen Natursystem (Nürnberg: Raspe, 1789), suppl. 153 (first publ. 1776);
    • P. m. damarensis = Damara Sparrow – for Damaraland, and Latin -ensis = geographical adjectival suffix – collected by Anton Lübbert, briefly described by Anton Reichenow in ‘Neue Vogelarten aus Damaraland’, Ornithologische Monatsberichte, 10/5 (1902), 77, as Passer arcuatus damarensis;
    • P. m. melanurus – the nominate form;
    • P. m. vicinus = Village Sparrow – from Latin vicus = town, village, and Latin -inus = adjectival suffix – collected by M.O.E. Baddeley near Bethlehem, Free State province, South Africa, on 28 July 1955, described by Scottish ornithologist Phillip Clancey in ‘Polytypic variation in the sparrow Passer melanurus (Müller)’, Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 78/3 (1958), 59–60;
  • Northern Grey-headed SparrowPasser griseus = Grey Sparrow – from Latin griseus = grey – described by French ornithologist Louis Jean Pierre Vieillot in Nouveau dictionnaire d’histoire naturelle (new edn., Paris: Deterville, 1817), xii. 198, as Fringilla grisea, and with distribution ‘United States’ (perhaps an allusion to the Four Communes);
    • P. g. griseus – the nominate form;
    • P. g. laeneni = Laenen’s Sparrow – for Belgian ornithologist Julien René Laenen, and Latin -i = adjectival suffix – type specimen collected by Günther Niethammer near Bol, on the eastern border of Lake Chad, on 1 April 1954, described in ‘Zur Vogelwelt des Ennedi-Gebirges (Französisch Äquatorial-Afrika)’, Bonner Zoologische Beiträge, 6/1–2 (1955), 75–76;
    • P. g. ugandae = Uganda Sparrow – for Uganda, and Latin -e = adjectival suffix – described briefly by Anton Reichenow in Die Vögel Afrikas (Neudamm: Neumann, 1904), iii. 231;
  • Swainson’s SparrowPasser swainsonii = Swainson’s Sparrow – for English ornithologist William John Swainson, and Latin -ii = adjectival suffix – described by German naturalist Eduard Rüppell in Neue Wirbelthiere zu der Fauna von Abyssinien gehörig (Frankfurt am Main: Schmerber, 1840), 94, as Pyrgita Swainsonii;
  • Parrot-billed SparrowPasser gongonensis = Gongoni Sparrow – for Gongoni, Kenya, and Latin -ensis = geographical adjectival suffix – collected at Gongoni in July 1880, described by French zoologist Émile Oustalet in ‘Description de deux nouvelle espèces d’oiseaux de l’Afrique orientale’, Le naturaliste, 2nd ser., 4/90 (1890), 274, as both Passer gononensis and Pseudostruthus gongonensis, though the former is mentioned first;
  • Swahili SparrowPasser suahelicus = Swahili Sparrow – for the Swahili Coast, and Latin -cus = adjectival suffix (pertaining to) – described briefly by Anton Reichenow in Die Vögel Afrikas (Neudamm: Neumann, 1904), iii. 231, as Passer griseus suahelicus;
  • Southern Grey-headed SparrowPasser diffusus = Widespread Sparrow – from Latin diffusus = diffuse, extensive – described by Scottish zoologist Andrew Smith in Report of the Expedition for Exploring Central Africa, from the Cape of Good Hope (Cape Town: Government Gazette Office, 1836), 50 (app. 1), as Pyrgita diffusa;
    • P. d. luangwae = Luangwa Sparrow – for the Luangwa Valley, Zambia, and Latin -e = adjectival suffix – type specimen collected by English ornithologist Constantine Walter Benson in the Luangwa Valley, Mpika District, Zambia, on 21 June 1954, described in ‘The relationship between Passer griseus (Vieillot) and Passer diffusus (Smith), with the description of a new race of the latter’, Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 76/3 (1956), 40;
    • P. d. mosambicus = Mozambique Sparrow – for Mozambique, and Latin -us = adjectival suffix – at the 256th meeting of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 13 April 1921, Australian zoologist Victor Van Someren presented in absentia a description of the type specimen, collected near Lumbo, Mozambique (then Portuguese East Africa), on 13 July 1918, published in Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 41/259 (1921), 114, as Passer griseus mosambicus;
    • P. d. diffusus – the nominate form;
    • P. d. stygiceps = Dark-headed Sparrow – from Latin stygius = relating to the River Styx, the underworld, i.e. dark, and Latin -ceps = -headed – described by Scottish ornithologist Phillip Clancey in ‘Miscellaneous taxonomic notes on African birds V: 2. A new subspecies of Grey-headed Sparrow Passer griseus (Vieillot) from Natal, South Africa’, Durban Museum Novitates, , 4/9 (1954), 116, as Passer griseus stygiceps;
  • Desert SparrowPasser simplex = Plain Sparrow – from Latin simplex = simple, plain – described briefly by Anton August Heinrich Lichtenstein in Verzeichniss der Doubletten des Zoologischen Museums der Königl. Universität zu Berlin (Berlin: Trautwein, 1831), 24, as Fringilla simplex;
    • P. s. saharae = Sahara Sparrow – for the Sahara, and Latin -e = adjectival suffix – collected by German ornithologist Carlo von Erlanger in ‘Beiträge zur Avifauna Tunsiens’, Journal für Ornithologie, 47/4 (1899) 472–476;
    • P. s. simplex – the nominate form;
  • Zarudny’s SparrowPasser zarudnyi = Zarudny’s Sparrow – for Ukranian zoologist Nikolai Zarudny, and Latin -i = adjectival suffix – type specimen collected by Russian zoologist Theodor Pleske in Transcaspian Oblast on 18 April 1892, decribed in ‘Описаніе новой разновидности пустыннаго воробья (Passer simplex Zarudnyi, n. subsp.) изъ Закаспійской области’ [Description of a new variety of Desert Sparrow (Passer simplex Zarudnyi, n. subsp.) from the Transcaspian Province], Annuaire du Musée zoologique de l’Académie impériale des sciences de St.-Péterbourg, 1 (1896), 32 (French index lists: ‘Description d’une nouvelle varieté du Passer simplex de la province Transcaspienne’), as Passer simplex Zarudnyi – 2009 split from Passer simplex;
  • Tree Sparrow Passer montanusEurasian Tree SparrowPasser montanus = Mountain Sparrow – from Latin mons, montis = mountain, and Latin -anus = adjectival suffix (pertaining to) – described by Carl Linnaeus (as Caroli Linnæi) in Systema naturæ (10th edn., Holmiæ: Laurentii Salvii, 1758), i. 183, as Fringilla montana with Passer montanus in the list of synonyms;
    • P. m. montanus – the nominate form
    • P. m. dybowskii = Dybowski’s Sparrow – for Polish naturalist Benedykt Dybowski, and Latin -i = adjectival suffix – described by Polish ornithologist Janusz Domaniewski in Comptes rendus des séances de al Société des sciences de Varsovie, 8/7 (1915), 562, 566;
    • P. m. transcaucasicus = Transcaucasus Sparrow – from Latin trans- = beyond, for Caucasus, and Latin -icus = adjectival suffix (pertaining to) – collected by Russian zoologist Aleksandr Mihajlovič Kobylin in Transcaucasia, described by Russian ornithologist Sergei Buturlin in ‘On the birds collected in Transcaucasia by Mr. A.M. Kobylin’, Ibis, 8th ser., 6/23 (1906), 423;
    • P. m. kansuensis = Gansu Sparrow – for Gansu Province, China, and Latin -ensis = geographical adjectival suffix – described by Erwin Stresemann in ‘Neue Formen aus Nord-Kansu VIII’, Ornithologische Monatsberichte, 40/2 (1932), 55;
    • P. m. dilutus = Pale Sparrow – from Latin dilutus = weak, diluted – type specimen collected by American ornithologist William Louis Abbott near Kashgar, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China (then Turkestan) on 21 March 1894, described by American ornithologist Charles Wallace Richmond in ‘Catalogue of a collection of birds made by Doctor W.L. Abbott in eastern Turkestan, the Thian-Shan Mountains, and Tagdumbash Pamir, central Asia, with notes on some of the species’, Proceedings of the United States National Museum, 18/1083 (1896), 575;
    • P. m. tibetanus = Tibetan Sparrow – for Tibet, and Latin -anus = adjectival suffix (pertaining to) – type specimen collected by English naturalist Herbert Walton near Khumbajong, Tibet, in October 1903, described by E. C. Stuart Baker at the 292th meeting of the British Ornithologists’ Club on 8 April 1925, published in Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 45/296 (1925), 92–93;
    • P. m. saturatus = Richly Coloured Sparrow – from Latin saturatus = richly coloured – type specimen collected by American scientist William Stimpson on the Ryakyu Islands (as Liu-Kiu Islands), Japan, in November 1854, described by Norwegian-born American ornithologist Leonhard Stejneger in ‘Passer saturatus, a new species of tree-sparrow from the Liu-Kiu Islands, Japan’, Proceedings of the United States National Museum, 8/2 (1885), 19–20, as Passer saturatus;
    • P. m. hepaticus = Liver-coloured Sparrow – from Latin hepar = liver, and Latin -aticus = relational adjectival suffix – type specimen collected by American ornithologist Sidney Dillon Ripley near Tezu in the Mishmi Hills, on the border of Indai and Tibet, on 11 January 1947, described in ‘New birds from the Mishmi Hills’, Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington, 61 (1948), 106–107;
    • P. m. malaccensis = Malacca Sparrow – for Malacca, and Latin -ensis = geographical adjectival suffix – described by Belgian naturalist Alphonse Joseph Charles Dubois in Faune des vertébrés de la Belgique. Serie des oiseaux (Bruxelles: Muquardt, 1887), i. 572–576, as Passer montanus var. Malaccensis – although an extensive description had already been published by Dutch scientist Adolphe Vorderman in ‘Batavische vogels, II’, Natuurkundig tijdschrift voor Nederlandsch Indië, 42 (1883), 82–83, no distictive epithet had been connected with the specimen, only as ‘an Asian variety’ of Passer montanus;
  • Sudan Golden SparrowPasser luteus = Saffron-yellow Sparrow – from Latin luteus = saffron-yellow – described briefly by Anton August Heinrich Lichtenstein in Verzeichniss der Doubletten des Zoologischen Museums der Königl. Universität zu Berlin (Berlin: Trautwein, 1831), 24, as Fringilla lutea;
  • Arabian Golden SparrowPasser euchlorus = Light-green Sparrow – from Greek ευ, eu = fine, and Greek χλωρος, khlōros = light green – described by French ornithologist Charles Lucien Bonaparte (as Carolo Luciano Bonaparte) in Conspectus generum avium (Luduni Batavorum, Brill, 1850), i. 519, as Auripasser euchlora;
  • Chestnut SparrowPasser eminibey = Emin Bey’s Sparrow – for German-Ottoman naturalist Emin Pasha (born Isaak Eduard Schnitzer, Bey is a Turkish title), and Latin -i = adjectival suffix, here interfix – discovered by Emin Pasha (Emin Bey), described by German ornithologist Gustav Hartlaub in ‘Ueber einige neue von Dr. Emin Bey, Gouverneur Aequatorialprovinzen Aegyptens, um Lado, Central-Afrika entdeckte Vögel’, Journal für Ornithologie, 28/150 (1880), 211 (erratum 325), as Sorella Emini Bey.

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